Journeys from Alchemy to Chemistry
(Cantonese)


 


IBN AL-HAYTHAM MYSTERIES OF
HOW WE SEE 1




Elephant Clock
The Elephant Clock was designed in the 13th century by the ingenious engineer Al-Jazari (1136–1206), who lived in Diar Bakir (in modern day Turkey). With an exquisite design, the water-powered clock was a masterpiece celebrating the diversity of humankind. It used as its timer a bowl that would slowly sink into a hidden water tank, a form of an Indian mechanism called ghatika. Combined with this were an Egyptian phoenix, Greek hydraulic technology, Chinese dragons, an Indian elephant and mechanical figurines in Arabian dress. The clock cleverly reflected cultural and technological influences from across Muslim civilisation, from Spain to China.
 

Scribe Clock
The Scribe Clock is another masterpiece by Al-Jazari. It is a small timekeeping device, which uses an innovative float-and-gear mechanism to tell the time. The pen in the the scribe’s hand moving on the dial was a precursor of the hour hand of modern timepieces.

 


Journeys from Alchemy to Chemistry
(Mandarin)


 


IBN AL-HAYTHAM MYSTERIES OF
HOW WE SEE 2




Astrolabe
The scholar Theon of Alexandria described astrolabes in the 4th century. But with a need to make more accurate astronomical observations, more sophisticated astrolabes were developed in Muslim civilisation. Astrolabes told the time during the day or night, helped people navigate on land and also identified stars as they rose in the east.
 

Hang Glider / VR Flight Simulator
Over 1000 years ago, inventor and scientist Abbas ibn Firnas, who lived in Cordoba (in modern day Spain) leapt from the top of a hill using a form of a wing fitted onto his arms. One can think about it as a form of an early Hang Glider machine! VR flight similator is available for the public to experience the fun of flying.